Want My Churro?

It’s the Monday after the Super Bowl, the day when one city celebrates joyously while the rest of the nation leaves football behind and gets back to the important task of the day… which is, of course, analyzing the halftime show and commercials. The former was epically awful, and February 6 will live in infamy as the day “Sweet Child O’ Mine” was officially ruined.

For the most part, the ads ranged from forgettable to, well, forgettable – with an occasional side of “What the HELL were they thinking?!” (Groupon, I’m looking at you. Apparently this is what you were thinking, but alas, that’s not what we saw.)

One commercial, however, made me laugh so loudly, and for so long, that it’s entirely possible that my neighbors now suspect that I am a crazy person:

It is, of course, a parody of this iconic Coke commercial, featuring Mean Joe Green, from the late 1970s:

I’m sure it’s truly hilarious only if you both know the earlier commercial and watch “House,” but I do, and it cracked me up. (Target audience: found.)

But that was just the commercial that made me laugh. The ad that was for me – and nearly everyone I’ve heard from in the preservation field – the clear winner of the day came from Chrysler. During the game last night, in what can only be considered a moment of total office geekery, my colleague Jason texted me to ask if he could share it on our Facebook page just as I was shooting it out via the work Twitter account. Clearly, social media-minded preservationists think alike. Jason had blogging duties today, and his thoughts – well worth a read – pretty much echo my own. And since he covered the words, I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves:

Oh, and about the football… Interceptions became touchdowns, Pittburgh fans went home sad, and all was right with the world.

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About Sarah Heffern

Writer. Editor. Preservationist. Social media enthusiast. Caps/Nats fan. Knitter. Reader. Traveler. Beer drinker. WDC via STNY.

9 thoughts on “Want My Churro?

  1. Hi Sarah, Great blog. I agree with all your points except one. For me, “Sweet Child of Mine” was already ruined twice before last night’s halftime show. First, when Sheryl Crow did a cover version for some Adam Sandler movie. Second, when Axl Rose got rid of all the original bad-ass members of Guns-N-Roses and replaced them with his fake Guns-N-Roses. But that’s just me. Again great blog. Tim

    1. Thanks, Tim. I gotta say, I had no idea Sheryl Crow covered that song (and you can bet I’m not gonna go looking for it!) and I like to pretend that GNR just broke up permanently with none of that craziness. It’s better that way.

  2. We also liked the Darth Vader VW add with the kid. It was cute. The rest of the ads were the usual crap.

    Except the Groupon Tibet ad was pathetic. I’ve been considering joining. Decision made. Not joining.

    Wish the Steelers had won but at least they showed up in the second half. Good game.

  3. I laughed so hard at the House commerical. How did it not get the publicity of the other commercials? (Probably because it was a self-promotion from Fox, but oh well)

    It took me a moment to realize what the commercial was parodying but OMG it was good!

    Groupon really screwed the pooch on that one. I think regardless of the “Any publicity is good publicity” saying, it’s gonna hurt despite their best intentions.

  4. Seriously, Sarah, how could you not include the Vader ad? That was hands down the best ad of the night.

  5. Forget what the polls said, I agree the Chrysler ad was one of the best of the night. It really showed what advertising was capable of–not just titillating viewers with sight-gags and cute kids–but changing the way people think about cars from Detroit. The ad was brilliant.

    Sadly, I think it takes sight gags to pull in viewers who are so overstimulated by the Super Bowl festivities.

    Darth Vader and the House as Mean Joe Green ads were also among my favorites. I had to pull up You Tube after the House spot to show it to my wife who had never seen it. Fantastic stuff.

  6. Sorry, the Chrysler ad was crap. And obviously ineffective for me.

    Great ads – like any great art – have to have roots in something REAL. That ad was based on delusion.

    Detroit has been mismanaged for decades by politicians, business managers and unions who believed the world stopped about 1948. The entire city (save perhaps Ford from about 2004 on) ignored the fact that their schools, their neighborhoods, their companies and their way of life was slowly turning to dust.

    Detroit hasn’t been reborn – it’s been propped up. But for the most part the real, painful changes required to compete haven’t taken place. Think of this way – 40% of Detroit’s adults are illiterate, that wouldn’t be able to read the liner notes for the 8 Mile soundtrack. But, hey, we got a good looking car and found a classic theater that hasn’t been trashed. All is well…

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